BOOT & SADDLE

1131 S. Broad Street,
Philadelphia, PA 19147

Work Drugs 7th Annual Holiday Spectacle

Work Drugs 7th Annual Holiday Spectacle

The City And Horses, The Chairman Dances

Sat, December 16, 2017

Doors: 7:30 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

The Boot & Saddle

Philadelphia, PA

$10.00 - $12.00

This event is 21 and over

Work Drugs
Work Drugs
Work Drugs is a smooth pop collective from Philadelphia by way of the Florida Keys. Work Drugs makes music specifically for sexting and yachting. Work Drugs is Tom Crystal, Ben Louisiana, Nero Catalano, and Jonas Oesterle. They are currently supporting their 2015 release Louisa, released on Bobby Cahn Records. Work Drugs have supported shows for Two Door Cinema Club, Phoenix, Peter Bjorn and John, Memoryhouse, and Band of Horses, to name a few. Work Drugs are winners of the 2011 Beijing Film and Art Festival's coveted Crying Monkey Award.
The City And Horses
Following in the footsteps of melodic mopers before them, The City and Horses make sad songs sound happy. Frontman Marc Cantone, who works as a children’s television producer by day, makes idiosyncratic indie pop that's all about the funk (emotional and otherwise). The band’s fourth full-length album, RUINS — a genre hopping lament about a love triangle between Marc, an ex-girlfriend and his OCD — was released by Paper Garden Records in April 2017. They have been featured on and in NPR, iTunes, WXPN, Indie Shuffle, BreakThru Radio, Magnet Magazine, LastFM, RCRD LBL and more.
The Chairman Dances
The Chairman Dances
The Chairman Dances is a bookish indie rock band from Philadelphia. Their EP, Samantha Says (Grizzly Records) was released the summer of 2015 and earned the group a devoted following, prompting favorable comparisons to the Decemberists, Belle and Sebastian, and the Smiths. Alternative radio station WXPN championed the record, calling The Chairman Dances “luminaries,” and bestowing on them the title “indie rock literati.”

Following on the heels of that EP is the full length Time Without Measure, out August 26. Time Without Measure was produced by Daniel Smith (Danielson), the producer and songwriter who helped launch Sufjan Stevens’ career. It’s fitting that Smith should be involved: like Stevens, The Chairman Dances explore history and biography, faith and doubt, in unexpected and meaningful ways. What sets Time Without Measure apart—and what makes the album so relevant in 2016—is its political nature. The album depicts the lives of 10 (mostly) activists who demanded progress and, in return, were demonized by the powers that be. These activists—each of whom has a song devoted to them, with their name serving as the song title—include Fannie Lou Hamer (a black civil rights leader reviled by southern Democrats), Dorothy Day (a Catholic anarchist), and a group of religious protesters dubbed the ‘Catonsville 9’ (who, during the Vietnam-era, broke into a government selective service building and burned draft files—the nine were later apprehended by the FBI.)

Given the political subject matter, you’d expect a punk record. But here The Chairman Dances defy expectation. On its face a political album, the songs are anything but political. Instead, they deal with the protagonists themselves, their fears, anxieties, moments of despair—but also their small victories, their sense of humor. As the UK blog Wake the Deaf writes, with The Chairman Dances, there are no happy or sad songs; rather, every song has “everything at once.” And if art is to “represent life then surely that’s the only way to go.”

Such lyrical aims might bring to mind John Darnielle (AKA, the Mountain Goats) or Leonard Cohen. These influences are present, but Time Without Measure is a band effort—more variegated than most singer songwriter fare, the album is not content to stay in any one mood for very long. Here, you get the smart, sing-along indie pop of “Fannie Lou Hamer” and “Dorothy Day,” both of which seem to channel the Magnetic Fields, or maybe Elvis Costello & the Attractions. Then there’s the driving, Yo La Tengo-esque rock of “Augustine” and “Cesar Chavez.” And, showcasing the group’s versatility, we find “Thérèse,” “Jimmy Carter,” and “Kitty Ferguson,” all of which use a lush palette reminiscent of Pet Sounds or Tortoise, and whose original musical forms show that rock can still push boundaries, still exhilarate.

The result is an impressive collage—a musically rich record that speaks of and to a turbulent era. An era that is fascinating and brilliant and downright terrifying. The Chairman Dances has its finger on the pulse of the nation. Time Without Measure is our soundtrack.
Venue Information:
The Boot & Saddle
1131 S. Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA, 19147
http://www.bootandsaddlephilly.com