BOOT & SADDLE

1131 S. Broad Street,
Philadelphia, PA 19147

You Won't

You Won't

The Suitcase Junket, Jocelyn Mackenzie

Sun, May 22, 2016

Doors: 7:30 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

The Boot & Saddle

Philadelphia, PA

$10.00 - $12.00

This event is 21 and over

You Won't
You Won't
You Won't is the musical duo of Josh Arnoudse and Raky Sastri, who first met in 1999 as unlikely fencing partners in a high school production of the Broadway flop "My Favorite Year." Some 17 years later, they are still collaborating closely but no longer assaulting each other with pointy metal rods. Since the release of their full-length debut "Skeptic Goodbye" in 2012, You Won't has toured across North America, garnering praise from the likes of SPIN, NPR, KEXP, and The New York Times for their raggedly infectious and charmingly idiosyncratic sound. Their dynamic and enthusiastically unorthodox live performances have earned them supports slots with The Lumineers, The Joy Formidable, Josh Ritter, Lucius, and Deer Tick, and an appearance on NBC's Last Call with Carson Daly. Their mixed feelings about social media have earned them scorn and derision. "Revolutionaries", the band's second LP, is at its heart a reflection on the crumbling of youthful idealism in the face of the compromises and moral ambiguities of adulthood. The title pays tribute both to the duo's childhood home of Lexington, Massachusetts (site of the first battle of the American Revolution) and to the enduring, quixotic sense of shared purpose that has fueled their creative partnership for more than a decade and a half. Prior to forming You Won't in early 2011, Arnoudse and Sastri had already been making theater, films, and music together for nearly a dozen years, enduring countless false starts, disappointments, and disillusionments along the way but never wavering in their support for each other and their collaborative vision. Their platonic marriage as a two-man rock'n'roll band proved the biggest challenge yet to this sacred artistic mission, and not coincidentally "Revolutionaries" is rife with references to shaken beliefs, shifting loyalties, and wounded pride. Self-produced by the band at home over a period of two and a half years, "Revolutionaries" is the product of a long, often Sisyphean recording process and approximately 10,000 hours spent banging foreheads against walls. The album's raw, driving, cacophonous aesthetic is more expansive and sonically adventurous than that of its predecessor, the natural outgrowth of the four-legged noise circus You Won't has been bringing to dive bars and rock clubs across the US for the past few years. At its musical core is the merging of Arnoudse's evocative lyrics, lilting melodies and punk-infused guitar with Sastri's nimble, jazz-inflected percussion and seemingly endless supply of obscure instrumentation (whirly tubes, electronic bagpipes, and singing saw are all employed here). Over 15 intertwining tracks, "Revolutionaries" tells a story of wrong turns, curveballs, and injured buttocks, interspersed with the occasional moment of unexpected clarity. Taken as a whole, the album is a thoughtful and frequently witty meditation on what we choose to believe, who we choose to believe in, and how these choices shape our lives. Most importantly, it represents the latest and most public salvo in a revolution that the members of You Won't have privately been leading, in some form or another, for the past 17 years.
The Suitcase Junket
The Suitcase Junket
"Remember the first day you heard The Suitcase Junket…his songwriting is extraordinary… this is one of the most exciting records I've heard in years." -Vin Scelsa of Idiot's Delight on WFUV and Sirius/XM

"Armed with vintage 1950s amps and a guitar he salvaged from a dumpster, an old, oversized suitcase he plays with his heel as a bass drum, a baby shoe hitting a gas can, a cook pot, a circular saw blade and a box of bones and silverware for added percussion, he let it rip! In my favorite session of the year, The Suitcase Junket performs 'Earth Apple' from his latest album, Make Time."
- Linda Fahey, NPR's Favorite Sessions of 2015


The Suitcase Junket will release his Signature Sounds debut, Dying Star, on March 4th. The 7- song E.P. features five songs recorded during the making of Lorenz's acclaimed 2015 album, Make Time, and two live tracks recorded at Northampton MA's The Parlor Room. With Dying Star, The Suitcase Junket is poised to make the jump from one of New England's best-kept roots star secrets, to a household name.

Artist, tinkerer, tunesmith, swamp Yankee, Matt Lorenz is a one-man salvage specialist singing into the hollow of a Dumpster guitar, slipping a broken bottleneck onto the slide finger, railing on a box of twisted forks and bones, rocking till every sound is ragged at its edges, till the house is singing back. Then, unplugging all the amps and letting one mountain ballad soar over the raw strings on that guitar.

Every night is a hard-driving, blues-grinding, throat-singing search-and-rescue junket. Sooner or later everything rusts, busts, and gets tossed into the junk heap: iron, bones, leather, hot rods, muskrats, the night, the heart. The goal is to recover it. To waste nothing. To create new ways from old. This is The Suitcase Junket.

Matt Lorenz was raised in Cavendish, Vermont, the son of teachers. He learned to sing by copying his sister Kate. (The siblings are two-thirds of the touring trio Rusty Belle.) Lorenz graduated from Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts, in 2004, having taught himself to throat-sing thanks to a South Indian cooking class. On moving day, he pulled his guitar, filled with mold and worse for wear, from a dorm Dumpster. He fixed it up and started pulling songs out of it. That was the beginning.

The Suitcase Junket is filling rooms and drawing festival crowds all over his native New England and beyond, from Signal Kitchen near the Canadian border to Wisconsin's Mile of Music Festival, from Ireland's pubs to Mountain Jam in the Catskills, from opening nights for Lake Street Dive and Charlie Musselwhite to Mountain Stage in West Virginia. He caught the attention of National Public Radio who chose his video session for "Earth Apple" from his 2015 album Make Time as one of the year's favorite sessions.
Jocelyn Mackenzie
Jocelyn Mackenzie is a Brooklyn-based, singer, songwriter, songwriting coach, percussionist, writer, fiber artist and all around maker of things. She is best known as 1/3 of indie-pop trio Pearl and the Beard, who released their farewell album Beast in 2015. The band is proud to have three songs from their catalog featured in Michael Showalter's new film Hello, My Name is Doris, starring Sally Field and Max Greenfield, in theaters in March 2016. The band has an extensive touring history across the US, UK and Canada with such noteworthy artists as Ani DiFranco, Neko Case, Iron & Wine, Ingrid Michaelson, Bastille, Dar Williams, Lucius, You Won't, David Wax Museum, Lady Lamb, The Drums, Matt + Kim, Sharon Van Etten and more.

Mackenzie is a proud volunteer at the Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls, for which she has performed, coached, and given songwriting workshops for young musicians. In 2015 Mackenzie collaborated with Emily Hope Price to write and perform music for the independent theater piece All We Have Left, granted by the Jim Henson Foundation and the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center. Mackenzie is eager to release her new EP Unlovely later this year, which features a collaboration with Ani DiFranco and handmade accessories and jewelry for the album's cover art. In addition to her accessories design and music, Mackenzie also knits professionally and has created garments for such clients as Coach, Helmut Lang, Calvin Klein and Edun. Yep.
Venue Information:
The Boot & Saddle
1131 S. Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA, 19147
http://www.bootandsaddlephilly.com