BOOT & SADDLE

1131 S. Broad Street,
Philadelphia, PA 19147

Jesse Malin

Jesse Malin

Travel Lanes, Don DiLego

Sat, July 25, 2015

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 8:30 pm

The Boot & Saddle

Philadelphia, PA

$12.00 - $14.00

This event is 21 and over

Jesse Malin
Jesse Malin
It's been five years since Jesse Malin last released an album, and that only upped the stakes for this one. New York Before the War is a hymn to everything Malin believes in most: respecting your roots, grabbing the future by its throat, and creating a soundtrack for a life filled with meaning. None of those things is easy to do, especially now. In fact, that's what the war in the title is all about: the battle to create and hold onto what's worthwhile even as so many forces, both internal and in the world outside, conspire to sweep it away. At the very top of that list is music.

"I wanted to make a record that encompassed everything I've been through since I started playing hardcore when I was twelve or thirteen," Malin says. Two years ago he had completed an album "out in the country" at White Star Studio near Charlottesville, VA. But then he realized it really wasn't finished. "Late last December, just back from a tour, I found myself sitting in my studio apartment in an old, crooked building that had the words THE WAR boldly painted on its side," Malin says. "In the silence of the holidays, away from family and friends, I found myself questioning everything I believed in. Looking out the window at a broken world where our values, culture and art have become instantly disposable, I felt lost and alienated, but still yearning for something more. Turning to my music, I tried to carve out a place where I could once again exist, and I sat down and wrote the rest of this record."

He ended up with close to forty songs. "I've always been a fan of the album as an art form," Malin says, and New York Before the War is a unified statement. It opens with "The Dreamers," a haunting ballad that nearly became the album's title track. Resting on an elegant piano figure, the song evokes both the alienation and the sense of deep connection that travel can bring. Wherever you are and whomever you meet, "the blood still runs red," Malin sings. That sense of doubleness, that emotional complexity – carving your own path but desperate for connection to a larger community -- runs throughout the album. Darker meditations like "She's So Dangerous" and "Bar Life" nestle next to rockers like "Freeway" (which features a blistering solo by the MC5's Wayne Kramer) and "Turn Up the Mains" (with Alejandro Escovedo on backing vocals).

Even within individual songs a sense of openness and possibility sometimes feels inextricable from the lure of destruction. In "Death Star" a woman gains a wealthy lover who "dresses to the right," but loses her soul. The jauntily upbeat "Bent Up" is about a friend and former band mate who died of a drug overdose. It's a roses-and-thorns kind of thing. The very qualities that make you compelling and creative can spiral you down. And, as with the lure of technology today, things that feel good and make your life seem easier can also destroy you.

"I always thought of music as a lifestyle, a place to exorcise your demons, connect with others and rejoice in the lonely places," Malin says. "Somehow there's a romance and an energy to all of this."

Peter Buck contributes a vintage R.E.M.-style guitar part to "I Would Do It For You," a tale of personal loyalty filled with longing and an aching sense of conviction. "That's my favorite and maybe most honest lyric on the record," Malin says. "It's about someone from your past who tracks you down and needs something from you, and because of your history, you can't say no. I never say what it is – whether it's a crime, drugs, a sexual relationship."

Malin finished New York Before the War at the Magic Shop in Soho and Flux Studios on Avenue A . Players include guitarist Derek Cruz, who co-produced the New York sessions with Malin; bassist Catherine Popper, who has played with Ryan Adams and Jack White; and drummers Randy Schrager (Scissor Sisters) and Paul Garisto, who played on Malin's debut solo album, The Fine Art of Self-Destruction, and with the Psychedelic Furs. Guitarist Don Dilego played on and produced the sessions in Virginia.

"New York Before the War is a metaphor for surviving in an ever-changing, rapidly desensitized world, while trying to find a way to live truly," Malin says. "It's not one particular war, but a global sentiment made for these times. It's a daily battle to keep the human spirit alive. Things are moving fast and forward, and this is my life right now." – Anthony DeCurtis
Travel Lanes
Driving down a highway, you'll usually find there are two lanes--one traveling in each direction. On larger freeways, there may be multiple lanes and a shoulder for emergency stops. If we think of some great metaphor to tie this all together, we'll let you know.

Travel Lanes are a band with a past. They hail from Philadelphia with only one wish......your time......and maybe a few bucks so they can record a few more tunes. Take a listen. Come out to a gig.

TRAVEL LANES is:

Frank Brown-guitar/lead vocals
Mitch Cojocariu-bass/backing vocals
Derek Feinberg-lead guitar/backing vocals
John Bicer-drums
Don DiLego
Don DiLego
"New York City's emerging folk-twang songsmith, Don DiLego, is alt-country's next poster boy." Rolling Stone

"Don DiLego is a storyteller who invokes vivid imagery in the vein of Johnny Cash." Northeast Performer Magazine

" ....rustic, accessible ballad that would sound right blaring from a pickup truck on a darkening highway....DiLego is cut from the same cloth as performers like Wilco and the Avett Brothers € his songs take country ballads one step beyond their obvious conclusion, yielding a genre-bending hybrid of indie rock and country." NY Indie Music Examiner.com

DiLego brings an alt-country sensibility to an urban landscape: "The street lights are breathing hard, and the crowd shakes far beneath my feet, he sings in a soaring chorus that recalls Dion as much as Jackson Browne. That fusion of country lilt and old-fashioned rock muscle, along with lyrics that don't settle for the usual tropes, make Western and Atlantic‚ a keeper. Peter Chianca, Gatehouse News

""From the EP's opener, the slide guitar driven Midnight Train to the final track, the intimate Carry On he touches base with Jeff Tweedy and Howe Gelb. Television Sun starts like an outtake of Neil Young's Harvest Moon before evolving into a road movie theme song that could have been written by Steve Earle." Hans Werksman, Here Comes The Flood

"The Holiday"€ has a lovely melody reminiscent of gospel-soul, but features a weeping steel guitar and harmonica, while the ghostly piano, distorted guitars, and Beach Boys harmonies of €œ"Lonely Couples" would have fit beautifully on Wilco's Summerteeth. " - David Lifton, Popdose

"The resulting "what-you-hear-is what-you-get sort of affair is a solid product that both mesmerizes and enlightens." Joe Ross, CD Insight

"From lonesome heartachers to smart, sparkly, alt-country pop, Don DiLego's brand of sometimes subdued, sometimes punchy twang-rock finds it's true north on "Photographs of 1971." Volume up!" Kate Bradley, XM Radio

"The disc recaptures the rhythm of 70's movies and photographs, as well as DiLego's own distinct take on alt-country." David Dye / The World Cafe, WXPN
Venue Information:
The Boot & Saddle
1131 S. Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA, 19147
http://www.bootandsaddlephilly.com